Category Archives: nox

Constantine cavafy biography

By | 04.10.2020

Constantine P.

constantine cavafy biography

Cavafy, also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis, or Kavaphes was a renowned Greek poet who lived in Alexandria and worked as a journalist and civil servant. He published poems; dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form.

His most important poetry was written after his fortieth birthday. His father was a prosperous importer-exporter who had lived in England in earlier years and acquired British nationality. After his father died inCavafy and his family settled for a while in Liverpool in England. Inhis family faced financial problems due to the Long Depression ofso, bythey had to move back to Alexandria. Indisturbances in Alexandria caused the family to move again, though temporarily, to Constantinople.

This was the year when a revolt broke out in Alexandria against the Anglo-French control of Egypt, thus precipitating the Anglo-Egyptian War.

Constantine P. Cavafy

Alexandria was bombarded by a British fleet and the family apartment at Ramleh was burned. InCavafy returned to Alexandria, where he lived for the rest of his life. His first work was as a journalist; then he took a position with the British-run Egyptian Ministry of Public Works for thirty years.

Egypt was a British protectorate until He published his poetry from to in the form of broadsheets, and only for his close friends.

Any acclaim he was to receive came mainly from within the Greek community of Alexandria. Eventually, inhe was introduced to mainland-Greek literary circles through a favourable review by Xenopoulos. He received little recognition because his style differed markedly from the then-mainstream Greek poetry. It was only 20 years later, after the Greek defeat in the Greco-Turkish Warthat a new generation of almost nihilist poets e.

Karyotakis would find inspiration in Cavafy's work. A biographical note written by Cavafy reads as follows: "I am from Constantinople by descent, but I was born in Alexandria—at a house on Seriph Street; I left very young, and spent much of my childhood in England. Subsequently I visited this country as an adult, but for a short period of time. I have also lived in France. During my adolescence I lived over two years in Constantinople. It has been many years since I last visited Greece.

My last employment was as a clerk at a government office under the Ministry of Public Works of Egypt. I know English, French, and a little Italian. Since his death, Cavafy's reputation has grown.

He is now considered one of the finest European and modern Greek poets. His poetry is taught at schools in mainland Greece and Cyprus, and across universities around the world.

Forster knew him personally and wrote a memoir of him, contained in his book Alexandria. Forster, Arnold Toynbee, and T. Eliot were among the earliest promoters of Cavafy in the English-speaking world before the Second World War. InDavid Hockney made a series of prints to illustrate a selection of Cavafy's poems, including In the dull village.

Work Cavafy was instrumental in the revival and recognition of Greek poetry both at home and abroad. His poems are, typically, concise but intimate evocations of real or literary figures and milieux that have played roles in Greek culture.

Uncertainty about the future, sensual pleasures, the moral character and psychology of individuals, homosexuality, and a fatalistic existential nostalgia are some of the defining themes. Besides his subjects, unconventional for the time, his poems also exhibit a skilled and versatile craftsmanship, which is almost completely lost in translation.

Cavafy was a perfectionist, obsessively refining every single line of his poetry.Cavafy wrote poems, while dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form. During his lifetime, he consistently refused to formally publish his work and preferred to share it through local newspapers and magazinesor even print it out himself and give it away to anyone interested.

His most important poems were written after his fortieth birthday, and officially published two years after his death. Cavafy was born in in AlexandriaEgyptto Greek parents who originated from the Greek community of Constantinople Istanbuland was baptized into the Greek Orthodox Church.

His father was a prosperous importer-exporter who had lived in England in earlier years and acquired British nationality. After his father died inCavafy and his family settled for a while in Liverpool. Inhis family faced financial problems due to the Long Depression ofso, bythey had to move back to Alexandria.

Indisturbances in Alexandria caused the family to move again, though temporarily, to Constantinople. This was the year when a revolt broke out in Alexandria against the Anglo-French control of Egypt, thus precipitating the Anglo-Egyptian War. Alexandria was bombarded by a British fleet, and the family apartment at Ramleh was burned. InCavafy returned to Alexandria, where he lived for the rest of his life.

His first work was as a journalist; then he took a position with the British-run Egyptian Ministry of Public Works for thirty years. Egypt was a British protectorate until He published his poetry from to in the form of broadsheets, and only for his close friends. Any acclaim he was to receive came mainly from within the Greek community of Alexandria. Eventually, inhe was introduced to mainland-Greek literary circles through a favourable review by Gregorios Xenopoulos.

He received little recognition because his style differed markedly from the then-mainstream Greek poetry. It was only twenty years later, after the Greek defeat in the Greco-Turkish War —that a new generation of almost nihilist poets e. Karyotakis found inspiration in Cavafy's work. He died of cancer of the larynx on April 29,his 70th birthday.

Since his death, Cavafy's reputation has grown. His poetry is taught in school in Greece and Cyprusand in universities around the world. Forster knew him personally and wrote a memoir of him, contained in his book Alexandria. Forster, Arnold J. Toynbeeand T.

Eliot were among the earliest promoters of Cavafy in the English-speaking world before the Second World War. Cavafy was instrumental in the revival and recognition of Greek poetry both at home and abroad.Constantine P. He lived most of his life in Alexandria, Egyptloved English and French literatureand generally spoke English; even his Greek had a British accent. His father, a merchant in the import-export business, worked in Constantinople and Englandestablishing a firm with his brother George, The family eventually settled in Alexandria, where Constantine was born.

The branch offices that had been established in Liverpool and London declined and failed, and after some seven years most of the family returned to Alexandria. They were once again uprooted inwhen the British bombarded the city and then occupied it. The years Cavafy spent in England during his youth were instrumental in the formation of his cosmopolitan character. He wrote much but was his own harshest critic, publishing only about poems.

His language is a mixture of the refined and stilted Greek called Katharevusa, inherited from the Byzantinesand the Demotic, or spoken, tongue. His style and tone are intimate and realistic. The lyric treatment he gave to familiar historical themes made him popular and influential after his death.

English translations of his work are numerous and include The Poems of C. CavafyThe Complete Poems of Cavafyexpanded ed. Cavafy Article Media. Info Print Cite. Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree See Article History. Britannica Quiz.

Get exclusive access to content from our First Edition with your subscription. Subscribe today. Learn More in these related Britannica articles:. Constantine Cavafy, an ethnic Greek who lived most of his life in Alexandria, Egypt, is frequently ranked among the great poets of the early 20th century.

Two Greek poets have won the Nobel…. Greek literature: Demoticism and folklorism, —Constantine P. Cavafy, also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis, or Kavaphes was a renowned Greek poet who lived in Alexandria and worked as a journalist and civil servant. He published poems; dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form.

His most important poetry was written after his fortieth birthday. His father was a prosperous importer-exporter who had lived in England in earlier years and acquired British nationality.

Ithaca by Constantine P. Cavafy

After his father died inCavafy and his family settled for a while in Liverpool in England. Inhis family faced financial problems due to the Long Depression ofso, bythey had to move back to Alexandria. Indisturbances in Alexandria caused the family to move again, though temporarily, to Constantinople. This was the year when a revolt broke out in Alexandria against the Anglo-French control of Egypt, thus precipitating the Anglo-Egyptian War. Alexandria was bombarded by a British fleet and the family apartment at Ramleh was burned.

InCavafy returned to Alexandria, where he lived for the rest of his life. His first work was as a journalist; then he took a position with the British-run Egyptian Ministry of Public Works for thirty years. Egypt was a British protectorate until He published his poetry from to in the form of broadsheets, and only for his close friends. Any acclaim he was to receive came mainly from within the Greek community of Alexandria.

Eventually, inhe was introduced to mainland-Greek literary circles through a favourable review by Xenopoulos.

constantine cavafy biography

He received little recognition because his style differed markedly from the then-mainstream Greek poetry. It was only 20 years later, after the Greek defeat in the Greco-Turkish Warthat a new generation of almost nihilist poets e.

Karyotakis would find inspiration in Cavafy's work. A biographical note written by Cavafy reads as follows: "I am from Constantinople by descent, but I was born in Alexandria—at a house on Seriph Street; I left very young, and spent much of my childhood in England.

Subsequently I visited this country as an adult, but for a short period of time. I have also lived in France. During my adolescence I lived over two years in Constantinople. It has been many years since I last visited Greece. My last employment was as a clerk at a government office under the Ministry of Public Works of Egypt. I know English, French, and a little Italian.

Since his death, Cavafy's reputation has grown. He is now considered one of the finest European and modern Greek poets. His poetry is taught at schools in mainland Greece and Cyprus, and across universities around the world. Forster knew him personally and wrote a memoir of him, contained in his book Alexandria. Forster, Arnold Toynbee, and T. Eliot were among the earliest promoters of Cavafy in the English-speaking world before the Second World War.

InDavid Hockney made a series of prints to illustrate a selection of Cavafy's poems, including In the dull village. Work Cavafy was instrumental in the revival and recognition of Greek poetry both at home and abroad.Constantine P. Cavafy Quotes. Cavafy was the first modernist Greek poet. He revolutionized Greek poetry, but his work shows clear affinities with Hellenistic poetry of the Alexandrian era. Cavafy was born in Alexandria, Egypt.

Poet Constantine P. Cavafy

His father, a prosperous export merchant from Constantinople, died inand two years later the family moved to England. They returned to Alexandria in and, except for three years in Constantinople and brief visits to Athens and other cities, Cavafy spent the rest of his life there.

Between and he supported himself in clerical and minor administrative posts in the Egyptian Ministry of Irrigation. He died in of cancer in Alexandria. As a poet, Cavafy was an exceptionally meticulous, slow worker, completing to his satisfaction only 24 poems before he was 48 when he believed that he had reached his poetic maturity and only before his death.

Aside from occasional magazine publication, the poems were privately printed, and a collected edition was not available until A complete English translation did not appear until In order to understand Cavafy, one must have some knowledge of Alexandria, for the spirit of that city and its history contributed much to Cavafy's poetry. Alexandria was founded by Alexander the Great in B.

It was the center of the Hellenistic world. It was particularly famous for the Mouseion in effect a research university and associated library, which may have had as many asrolls including Aristotle's librarythe largest in the world. Euclid, Aristarchus of Samothrace, and Callimachus were among the great scholars who worked there.

In Alexandria differences of opinion were not only tolerated but encouraged. Gnosticism, Neoplatonism, Judaism, and Christianity all had followers here—traditionally St. Mark founded Christianity in Alexandria—and the population was an eclectic mixture, as it was again in Cavafy's day, of Greeks, Egyptians, Jews, and others.

An indication of the curious blend of cultures and ideas in Alexandria was the local worship of Serapis mentioned by Cavafy in his poemsa god whose characteristics showed traces of both Greek and Egyptian influences. The complex, always changing culture of Alexandria gave its citizens little sense of stability or permanence, and for that they turned to art, to the well crafted artifice of a poem.

For Cavafy, as for the ancient Alexandrians, permanence was principally the property of art, not civilization or nature. Cavafy's poems are often self-consciously antiquarian, dealing with obscure corners of history, and this trait he also shares with famous Alexandrian predecessors. Furthermore, like his predecessors, he created his own highly artificial poetic language, a mixture of demotic and purist Greek, deliberately employing archaisms and colloquialisms.

Also like the poetry of the ancient Alexandrians, Cavafy's is less the result of sudden inspiration than the result of the most scrupulous craftsmanship. It is the poetry of a very learned, very intelligent man.

Most modernist poets did their greatest work in lyric poetry, but Cavafy turned to the elegiac epigram, which had been perfected by Callimachus and his contemporaries.

The elegiac epigram was originally intended for inscriptions on funerary monuments, but the Alexandrians developed it into an objective, cool, and often ironic poetic form. Robert Browning achieved similar poetic effects in his dramatic monologues, and these certainly had their effect on Cavafy, but the primary influence seems, as always, to have been Alexandrian.

One persistent theme in ancient elegiac epigrams, particularly in the highly regarded work of Strato, is homosexuality, and this is also a principal theme for Cavafy. Most of his best poems, in fact, which do not deal with episodes, real or imagined, from the Hellenistic world deal with homosexuality.A day ends at 00:00 UTC time.

A Stop Limit order is an order to buy or sell a currency once the price reaches a specified price, known as the stop price. Your order will be placed immediately. Maximum 100 orders are allowed to be placed.

Please adjust your settings. Click on the trading pair in title to see ALL orders and trades. The entire history is available here. Register today and get instant access to your demo account. Join HitBTC Try demo trading Knowledge is power Our platform gives you all the info you need, when you need it.

constantine cavafy biography

Get trading We handle thousands of trades fordifferent crypto pairs daily. Learn more in our Blog Are you sure you want to place sell order. Pair Amount Price Cancel Sell Limit Are you sure you want to place buy order.

Pair Amount Price Cancel Buy Limit You have order(s) at cancel order(s) Bid price is the best price at which a market maker is willing to buy a currency. Ask price is the best price a seller is willing to accept for a currency. High is the highest price registered in the last 24 hours. Low is the lowest price registered in the last 24 hours.

Volume is the amount of currency that trade hands from sellers to buyers as a measure of activity. Change is the difference between the current price and the last trade. We will reach you via provided email shortly. Ask Again Type of question Message Name Email Attach files JPEG, PNG, PDF files. GET STARTED TAKE A TOUR Create your own betting systems with our extensive sports betting database.

Find valuable angles through data analysis, not touts. Get instant access to hundreds of systems made by the community and the pros at Bet Labs. Building your systems is as easy as point and click. Follow on TwitterLike on FacebookWatch on YouTube. Morris May 6, 2017 The Kentucky Derby is set to kick off in mere hoursat 6:34 p. Eastern, to be preciseand will be all over in about two minutes. Other horse betting sites include TVG and Bovada. Bovada uses a Latvian domain and also takes bets on sports other than horseracing, which are less likely to be legal in the U.

If you want to get really adventurous, you could try betting with Bitcoin.Odds are expressed in several ways (see below), and sometimes the term is used incorrectly to mean simply the probability of an event.

In both gambling and statistics, the 'odds' are a numerical expression of the likelihood of some possible event. In gambling, odds represent the ratio between the amounts staked by parties to a wager or bet. In simplest terms, 6 to 1 odds means if you bet a dollar (the "1" in the expression), and you win you get paid six dollars (the "6" in the expression), or 6 x 1.

If you bet two dollars you would be paid twelve dollars, or 6 x 2. If you bet three dollars and win, you would be paid eighteen dollars, or 6 x 3. If you bet one hundred dollars and win you would be paid six hundred dollars, or 6 x 100. Of course if you lose any of those bets you would lose the dollar, or two dollars, or three dollars, or one hundred dollars.

One drawback of expressing the uncertainty of this possible event as odds for is that to regain the probability requires a calculation. The natural way to interpret odds for (without calculating anything) is as the ratio of events to non-events in the long run.

A simple example is that the (statistical) odds for rolling six with a fair die (one of a pair of dice) are 1 to 5.

This is because, if one rolls the die many times, and keeps a tally of the results, one expects 1 six event for every 5 times the die does not show six.

For example, if we roll the fair die 600 times, we would very much expect something in the neighborhood of 100 sixes, and 500 of the other five possible outcomes.

constantine cavafy biography

That is a ratio of 100 to 500, or simply 1 to 5. To express the (statistical) odds against, the order of the pair is reversed. Hence the odds against rolling a six with a fair die are 5 to 1. The gambling and statistical uses of odds are closely interlinked. If a bet is a fair one, then the odds offered to the gamblers will perfectly reflect relative probabilities. The profit and the expense exactly offset one another and so there is no advantage to gambling over the long run.

If the odds being offered to the gamblers do not correspond to probability in this way then one of the parties to the bet has an advantage over the other. Casinos, for example, offer odds that place themselves at an advantage, which is how they guarantee themselves a profit and survive as businesses.

The fairness of a particular gamble is more clear in a game involving relatively pure chance, such as the ping-pong ball method used in state lotteries in the United States. It is much harder to judge the fairness of the odds offered in a wager on a sporting event such as a football match. The language of odds such as "ten to one" for intuitively estimated risks is found in the sixteenth century, well before the development of mathematical probability.

Odds are expressed in the form X to Y, where X and Y are numbers. Usually, the word "to" is replaced by a symbol for ease of use. This is conventionally either a slash or hyphen, although a colon is sometimes seen.

When the probability that the event will not happen is greater than the probability that it will, then the odds are "against" that event happening. Odds of 6 to 1, for example, are therefore sometimes said to be "6 to 1 against". To a gambler, "odds against" means that the amount he or she will win is greater than the amount staked.

It means that the event is more likely to happen than not. This is sometimes expressed with the smaller number first (1 to 2) but more often using the word "on" ("2 to 1 on") meaning that the event is twice as likely to happen as not. Note that the gambler who bets at "odds on" and wins will still be in profit, as his stake will be returned. In common parlance, this is a "50-50 chance". Guessing heads or tails on a coin toss is the classic example of an event that has even odds.

In gambling, it is commonly referred to as "even money" or simply "evens" (1 to 1, or 2 for 1). The term "better than evens" (or "worse than evens") varies in meaning depending on context. Looked at from the perspective of a gambler rather than a statistician, "better than evens" means "odds against".

So, it is "better than evens" from the gambler's perspective because it pays out more than one-for-one. If an event is more likely to occur than an even chance, then the odds will be "worse than evens", and the bookmaker will pay out less than one-for-one.


Category: nox

thoughts on “Constantine cavafy biography

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *